Loncon3 – Friday

I write this while aching and sore from walking during the day and standing up for the last two hours.

My second day here at Worldcon started (after a disappointing breakfast) with the Stroll with the Stars, a short walk around the area near the convention. I enjoyed the walk, but didn’t speak to a single person there, which is pretty typical of me. The Stroll kind of fell apart near the end when it reached a set of statues dedicated to polo; most of the group stopped to look, some kept going, and then people trickled off a few at a time. I was one of those, as I wanted to get to my first panel.

That panel was Don’t Tell Me What To Think: Ambiguity in SF and Fantasy, which was fairly interesting. I had an early lunch there, then went on to the next panel, A Reader’s Life During Peak Short Fiction. I mentioned that I was going to this in an earlier post, and it was pretty good. The discussion was all about the markets that exist for short fiction in different formats, how that has changed, where it might go; it touched on the difficulty of finding the best stories for awards, anthologies, or best of lists, and how if you get a group of people, even those who read a large amount of short fiction, often you’ll find there’s little overlap in what they’ve read, because of the sheer size of the market right now. All pretty interesting. It also made me think again on that whole subject of supporting free fiction venues – I mentioned in that older post how my reading stories in Pocket is probably bad for the publishers.

Immediately after that, I ran downstairs to try to catch the last 5 minutes of Lauren Beukes’ signing slot, but they were already switching to the next group. So I went back upstairs to the Writing SF/F in Non-Western Modes panel. This was probably my favourite panel of the day, discussing culture, types of story, language, and just all that kind of thing. Entertaining,  enlightening,  all those words you say when you talk about something like this.

For the rest of the afternoon, I was pretty much chasing signatures. I attended Lauren Beukes’ reading, and though I’d read the book it is still interesting to hear the Q&A stuff, and afterwards she kindly signed my books. Then it was time for Elizabeth Bear in the official signing slots, so I got the full Eternal Sky trilogy signed (having picked up Steles of the Sky in the dealer’s room earlier, along with a bunch of new releases). Queuing for that meant I missed the next round of panels, so I didn’t do much for a while. I dropped most of my very heavy bag of books back at my hotel, then had a bite to eat – and for once not just a sandwich.

Jeff VanderMeer’s reading was next. He read some excerpts from Authority, and told a bunch of funny anecdotes about the absurd stuff from his past workplaces that have informed his fiction. After that he did a quick signing in the hall outside – I felt a bit awkward having a pile of 4 books when most of the other half-dozen or so people had only one or two. (I had brought 3 with me, but then Acceptance, which isn’t out officially until September, was on sale in the dealer’s room.)

My final Friday panel was on the 2014 Hugos Short Fiction ballot. This was a fairly interesting panel, talking about all of the Novella, Novelette, and Short Story nominees. Of course it touched on the Correia/Day thing, but mostly the panelists talked about what did and didn’t work in the stories themselves. For the most part what the panelists had to say agreed generally with my own feelings on the ballot (everyone seems very enthusiastic about John Chu’s The Water That Falls On You From Nowhere), so maybe some of my enjoyment of the panel came because it was confirming my own biases.

Finally, there was the Welcome Party. This consisted of a very crowded, very loud tent full of people chatting about stuff. I spent about an hour and a half talking to several other fans about all kinds of things, ranging from the Hugo Awards, to Night Vale, to Doctor Who, to Scottish independence. It was a fun end to the night; I enjoyed myself (despite my mouth being perpetually dry from having to talk so loudly over the crowd the whole time).

So, all in all not a bad day. Now that all my books are signed I’ll be spending more time in panels, and I’ll be posting all about that tomorrow.

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