7. Iron Man 3 (2013)

This post is part of a series I am writing on the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe from Iron Man to Endgame. There will be spoilers for the entire series of films.

Iron Man 3 (2013) Poster

Marvel’s Phase Two started off with something that was less a “phase two film” and more just a continuation of a remarkably successful franchise. With Jon Favreau choosing not to return as director, Shane Black was brought in to take over, having worked with Robert Downey Jr in the past. Because it’s a Shane Black film, it’s set at Christmas, although that has no real relevance to the plot.

Iron Man 3 does two interesting things with Tony Stark: It shows him vulnerable – suffering from panic attacks after he almost died in space in The Avengers – and it shows him suffering consequences for being an asshole to people. The film’s villain, Aldrich Killian, becomes who he is because Tony treated him like dirt back before Iron Man was a thing. When your hero is an arrogant prick who gets away with being an asshole because he’s rich and charismatic, it’s nice to sometimes bring him down a peg with things like that.

One of the more controversial elements of this film was the handling of the Mandarin. The Mandarin had been hinted at as a major villain for Iron Man since the first film, and although many more overt references didn’t make it into the final films, people were expecting a lot – and the film subverted it, presenting a fairly stereotypical middle-eastern terrorist only to reveal him as an actor, Trevor Slattery, hired by Aldrich Killian to distract people from the real source of the bombings. It’s a fun reveal, and Sir Ben Kingsley plays Trevor brilliantly, but apparently some fans didn’t like that the Mandarin turned out to not be what they expected. I didn’t have a problem with it myself. The presentation of the fake Mandarin feels a little dated these days, belonging to the 2000s and fears of Osama bin Laden, but it works for the film.

What’s not clear is what Killian’s plan was meant to be. I can understand him allowing people to think explosions caused by the Extremis formula were the act of terrorists as a cover up, but I’m not sure why he was carrying out such a coordinated terrorist campaign or even doing things publicly at all. The closest thing to an explanation I can see is that it was meant to draw out War Machine – rebranded Iron Patriot – so they could then use it to get the President, all in aid of installing the Vice President in the White House, who would support A.I.M.’s research… which seems kind of over-elaborate. They already had the VP on side, they had money and technology, they could probably have been pretty well positioned regardless. Why kill random people?

Of course it’s those random explosions blamed on terrorists that leads Tony to Killian. Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau) follows a suspicious-looking employee of Killian (Eric Savin, played by James Badge Dale) and ends up caught in one of the explosions, which leads Tony to try to track down the Mandarin and ultimately discover the connection with A.I.M.

Shane Black and co-writer Drew Pearce treat this more as an action thriller than a superhero blockbuster, and one result is that Tony spends most of his time out of the suit. It’s an opportunity to show the character as more than his high tech armour, as the inventor who could build an Iron Man suit in a cave with a pile of scrap. It also lets Black make full use of Robert Downey Jr without the CGI getting in the way, which is a positive. The focus on Tony without the armour is backed up by the final line of the film, a repeat of Downey’s final line in Iron Man: “I am Iron Man.” The same words, but this time after Tony has destroyed all of the suits he built when he was dealing with his paranoia and trauma. It leaves the impression that this is a new Tony, that he can be Iron Man without needing to wear the Iron Man suit.

Unfortunately that doesn’t seem to be what Marvel wants for the character, because the next time we see Tony, in Avengers: Age of Ultron, he’s back in the suit, back to being obsessed with protecting the world and building endless iterations of his Iron Man technology to do so. Iron Man 3 functions well as a cap on a 3-film sequence, moving past Tony’s dilemma from the first film – how can he protect the people he loves from the same weapons he helped create? – and leaving us with a satisfying conclusion, but because of the endless nature of the shared cinematic universe, the very next film they hit the reset button. They can’t do that forever in the films, of course – they’ve just gone and done the opposite in Endgame, killing Tony Stark and retiring Steve Rogers – but so long as a character is recurring there will always be this tendency to revert to default, especially when multiple creators are involved. It’s already a little surprising that the change in writer/director for Iron Man 3 resulted in a film that keeps so much to the spirit of Jon Favreau’s work on the first two.

The Iron Man trilogy came early in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, at a time when the films didn’t have to feel so clearly a part of a bigger world. That world is there, but the story is Tony Stark’s, and we get three films that are only about Tony Stark. You could begin and end your Marvel watching with just these three and feel like you got a complete story.

*

I’ve been meaning to write this post for a couple of weeks, so I’ve probably forgotten something I meant to say.

Oh, right. The voiceover at the beginning and end was out of place and unnecessary.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.