Tag Archives: convention

The Hugo Awards 2014

So the Hugo Awards were handed out on Sunday, and I was there for the ceremony. Despite some of the controversy about the shortlist – which I’ve spoken about before but won’t go into now – the results were pretty pleasing.

Ancillary Justice continued its clean sweep of the major awards – it has now won Hugo, Clarke, Nebula, BSFA, Locus, and Kitschie Awards, was shortlisted for the Philip K Dick award, and made the Tiptree Award Honors List. It’s pretty much the most successful novel ever published in the genre in terms of award wins. And there’s a sequel out soon, so expect to see that making a pretty big splash.

I was very happy to see John Chu and Mary Robinette Kowal take home awards for their stories, but I was a little more surprised by the Stross win – Equoid was a good story, but in my mind the category was between Cat Valente’s Six-Gun Snow White and Andy Duncan and Ellen Klages’ Wakulla Springs, and the panelists on Friday’s discussion of the short fiction ballot at Loncon3 had suggested the same. Looking at the full voting figures, it turns out Wakulla Springs wasn’t even close.

Kameron Hurley was a big success this year, taking home Best Fan Writer and Best Related Work for her essay “We ave Always Fought: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative”. That essay may have also played a part in the victory of Aiden Moher’s A Dribble of Ink in the Best Fanzine category. As I said back in my post about my votes, I had been very uncertain of what the “best” work was in the Related Work category, because it’s so hard to compare the different things; but Hurley’s work is one I can get behind winning the award.

Going through the full statistics is one of the more interesting parts of the Hugo Awards announcements; it’s always enlightening to see the actual numbers behind the results. Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form was always going to draw my eye, as I like to spot where the Doctor Who votes go as each entry is eliminated. “The Name of the Doctor”, among the worst episodes (that nevertheless made it onto the ballot), received the fewest votes for 1st place and ultimately ranked 5th. Interesting to note that of the 83 who ranked it 1st, 50 ranked “The Day of the Doctor” 2nd, and 6 listed no other preference after this one episode. Most of the votes for “The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot” similarly went to “The Day of the Doctor” or “An Adventure in Space and Time” when it was eliminated. The key here, though, is that it looks like almost as many people ranked Game of Thrones below their first choice Doctor Who item; that and the 2nd place votes of half the Orphan Black fans kept “The Red Wedding” in the lead.

The nomination details can be pretty interesting too; not only can you see what almost made it (The Shining Girls, Locke & Key, and Joey Hi-Fi were very close to the ballot in their respective categories), you also get to see just how low the bar is for nomination. While it takes about 100 nominations or more to get onto Best Novel, the Short Story that went on to win the award had only 43 nominations. All but one of the Best Graphic Story nominations received less than 40 noms (Saga was miles ahead with 164). And fully half of the Dramatic Presentation, Short Form list received less than 50 nominations. (The really awful Doctor Who Christmas special, “The Time of the Doctor”, was itself only 3 nominations short of the ballot, at 35.)

And looking at these numbers, I actually feel encouraged. Not because it’s a good thing they’re low, but because it means that the things that got onto the ballot that maybe weren’t very good, well, they actually weren’t that popular in the first place. It takes surprisingly little to get something on the shortlist, but once on there, it’s quality that tends to win out, as the wins for Ancillary Justice and “The Water That Falls On You From Nowhere” show. So I find myself wanting to keep taking part, and to encourage others to do so. I want to be one of those numbers, to bring the numbers required upward, and in so doing maybe to help make what’s on the ballot better reflect what’s good in the genre*.

I have nominating rights to next year’s Hugos, as a member of Loncon3. I might decide to buy a supporting membership to Sasquan, so that I can vote on the awards and also for Helsinki to host in 2017. Whatever I decide, I will be taking part on some level next year.

* I realise I sound like I’m trying to prescribe what other people should like, here. I don’t intend to fault people for enjoying what they enjoy; I just think it’s possible, for example, to like Doctor Who while acknowledging that it’s pretty often badly written and not on the same level as other eligible works. I enjoy watching Doctor Who; I just don’t think it’s great television.

Loncon3 – Saturday

I started today off with the Stroll with the Stars again, where I once again didn’t really talk to anyone. The walk wasn’t so great either, since today’s route was largely along streets and through housing estates. Oh well.

My first stop after the walk was a reading by Aliette de Bodard. She read from a novel about fallen angels and magic which was dark and interesting, and the longest piece I’ve heard at a reading so far. After that was the panel Imaginative Resistance, which was all about the kinds of subject matter that challenge and provoke the reader, and the types of things the panelists were or were not willing to write about. It was a pretty interesting discussion that touched on sex and violence and on just other difficult subjects they had approached.

After grabbing lunch, the second panel was Being a Fan of Problematic Things. I enjoyed this one, it was a very interesting and wide ranging discussion on problematic issues, on responses to problematic elements in various works, and just that whole area. If the panel had one problem it was that for a lot of the first half hour the moderator did most of the talking, and a couple of the panelists barely got to say a word. Later on it opened up, though, and improved a lot. I stayed in my seat after that panel ended for the one immediately after, Feminism and Sexism in Fandom. Another good one, on a similar subject. (I feel a bit awkward toward this subject matter, because I’m very interested in these topics and want to support the issues, but don’t feel as a straight white male that I’m at all qualified to talk about them.)

That panel done, I had a quick snack and then I met up with someone who kindly took me on a whirlwind tour of the fan village introducing me to people; I appreciated the gesture, but me being me I mostly wound up feeling awkward and not knowing what to say to anyone. Ah well.

It was back to panels after that, with the Full Spectrum Fantasy panel. This one was on a pretty similar subject to the rest of the afternoon’s panels, talking about diversity, in this case focusing mostly on disability, class, and race. Once again, interesting things, lots of good points made.

The final panel I sat in on was How Superheroes and Superheroines are Changing in Comics. The title pretty much says everything here: it was about superhero comics and movies, what’s happening in them, the recent moves toward diversity, and good depictions of superheroes in other areas, like prose novels.

And other than dinner, that was pretty much it for my Saturday. There was a little bit more in there but I really don’t want to talk about it in blog form. On to tomorrow; I’ve still not decided if I will attend the Hugo Awards Ceremony.

Loncon3 – Friday

I write this while aching and sore from walking during the day and standing up for the last two hours.

My second day here at Worldcon started (after a disappointing breakfast) with the Stroll with the Stars, a short walk around the area near the convention. I enjoyed the walk, but didn’t speak to a single person there, which is pretty typical of me. The Stroll kind of fell apart near the end when it reached a set of statues dedicated to polo; most of the group stopped to look, some kept going, and then people trickled off a few at a time. I was one of those, as I wanted to get to my first panel.

That panel was Don’t Tell Me What To Think: Ambiguity in SF and Fantasy, which was fairly interesting. I had an early lunch there, then went on to the next panel, A Reader’s Life During Peak Short Fiction. I mentioned that I was going to this in an earlier post, and it was pretty good. The discussion was all about the markets that exist for short fiction in different formats, how that has changed, where it might go; it touched on the difficulty of finding the best stories for awards, anthologies, or best of lists, and how if you get a group of people, even those who read a large amount of short fiction, often you’ll find there’s little overlap in what they’ve read, because of the sheer size of the market right now. All pretty interesting. It also made me think again on that whole subject of supporting free fiction venues – I mentioned in that older post how my reading stories in Pocket is probably bad for the publishers.

Immediately after that, I ran downstairs to try to catch the last 5 minutes of Lauren Beukes’ signing slot, but they were already switching to the next group. So I went back upstairs to the Writing SF/F in Non-Western Modes panel. This was probably my favourite panel of the day, discussing culture, types of story, language, and just all that kind of thing. Entertaining,  enlightening,  all those words you say when you talk about something like this.

For the rest of the afternoon, I was pretty much chasing signatures. I attended Lauren Beukes’ reading, and though I’d read the book it is still interesting to hear the Q&A stuff, and afterwards she kindly signed my books. Then it was time for Elizabeth Bear in the official signing slots, so I got the full Eternal Sky trilogy signed (having picked up Steles of the Sky in the dealer’s room earlier, along with a bunch of new releases). Queuing for that meant I missed the next round of panels, so I didn’t do much for a while. I dropped most of my very heavy bag of books back at my hotel, then had a bite to eat – and for once not just a sandwich.

Jeff VanderMeer’s reading was next. He read some excerpts from Authority, and told a bunch of funny anecdotes about the absurd stuff from his past workplaces that have informed his fiction. After that he did a quick signing in the hall outside – I felt a bit awkward having a pile of 4 books when most of the other half-dozen or so people had only one or two. (I had brought 3 with me, but then Acceptance, which isn’t out officially until September, was on sale in the dealer’s room.)

My final Friday panel was on the 2014 Hugos Short Fiction ballot. This was a fairly interesting panel, talking about all of the Novella, Novelette, and Short Story nominees. Of course it touched on the Correia/Day thing, but mostly the panelists talked about what did and didn’t work in the stories themselves. For the most part what the panelists had to say agreed generally with my own feelings on the ballot (everyone seems very enthusiastic about John Chu’s The Water That Falls On You From Nowhere), so maybe some of my enjoyment of the panel came because it was confirming my own biases.

Finally, there was the Welcome Party. This consisted of a very crowded, very loud tent full of people chatting about stuff. I spent about an hour and a half talking to several other fans about all kinds of things, ranging from the Hugo Awards, to Night Vale, to Doctor Who, to Scottish independence. It was a fun end to the night; I enjoyed myself (despite my mouth being perpetually dry from having to talk so loudly over the crowd the whole time).

So, all in all not a bad day. Now that all my books are signed I’ll be spending more time in panels, and I’ll be posting all about that tomorrow.

Loncon3 – Thursday

Hello! I am now in London, for my second trip of the week. This time I’m attending Loncon3, the 2014 World Science Fiction Convention.

Today was a pretty light day for activity, because it takes 4 hours to get to London by train. I took that as an opportunity to read half of Elizabeth Bear’s Shattered Pillars, because after finishing Range of Ghosts on Tuesday I just couldn’t resist moving straight on to the next one.

I got to my hotel by the convention centre at 2pm, which didn’t leave me all that much time to see things. After getting my badge from registration I did some wandering around the halls, and didn’t keep track of time enough to hit a 3pm panel. I wound up in the games tent for a quick game of Pandemic instead (we lost). What I did then have time for, by sacrificing the chance to have a full sit-down meal, was a 4.30 panel, Ideology vs Politics in Science Fiction, which was pretty interesting.

That’s all I managed at the con today, though. After the panel I grabbed a quick sandwich and headed off on the tube to Leicester Square, because I had a ticket to see Book of Mormon. I’m still not convinced I should have spent so much on a single show, particularly coming back from the much cheaper Edinburgh Fringe, but the show was good and I enjoyed it a lot.

Tomorrow, my con starts for real. I’m still trying to talk myself into the Stroll with the Stars first thing, but I’m not sure I can get over my fear of talking to people I don’t know. (I have similar thoughts regarding the Welcome Party on Friday night, but that’s farther away and I’m able to not think about it much.) I will be attending a lot more other stuff, though, and will post another update.