4. Thor (2011)

This post is part of a series I am writing on the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe from Iron Man to Endgame. There will be spoilers for the entire series of films.

Thor (2011) Poster
Kenneth Branagh’s Thor is a bit of an odd film. After the first time I saw it, I described it to someone as a “bad film, well made”, but I don’t think that quite gets it right.

On the one hand, the visual effects in this film are excellent. The studios involved did a great job bringing to life Asgard, the rainbow bridge, the bifrost. On the other hand, what the hell is with all the Dutch angles? Okay, I do actually know what’s up with them: Branagh has said he wanted to recreate the feel of comic book panels, which I can kind of understand, but he has seriously overdone it. It doesn’t quite ruin the film, but it does leave you baffled by the cinematography through pretty much the whole thing.

On the good side, Chris Hemsworth is a good pick for Thor, and we’ve seen that through all the films he’s done since, particularly when he’s allowed to go more toward the comedic side. Tom Hiddleston has also done well as Loki, although I think he’s better when he’s allowed to have more fun with the role in later films. But it’s the latter who gets the real meat of the story in Thor; the Odinson himself has a pretty minor arc: he starts out arrogant and hot-headed, spends some time in exile thinking he’s lost everything, then he learns a tiny bit of humility and wisdom and gets all that he lost back. Loki has an entire origin story.

It’s a bit of a shame that in his own introductory film Thor basically meanders about through some fish-out-of-water gags, a bit of moping, and not really doing much. His brother, meanwhile, having started out a little petty and jealous of Thor but ultimately having the best interests of Asgard in mind, goes on to discover the secret of his own identity, take over the kingdom when Odin (Anthony Hopkins) falls ill, and start doing increasingly shady things in order to try to prove his worthiness to his father, ultimately crossing lines that turn him into a villain. Both characters have the same goal – prove to their father they are worthy of the throne of Asgard – but Loki goes through it with more agency, and stands as an underdog with real grievances to address. He’s the most fleshed-out character in the film and has much more of a story in it than Thor does. It’s no wonder really that he became so popular.

Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg) and S.H.I.E.L.D. are once again a significant presence in the film, but this time in the role of a minor antagonist: the shady government agency who swoops in and tries to control and cover up what is happening. By this point Coulson and Nick Fury are really becoming the thread that holds the cinematic universe together, something that’d hold true right through The Avengers, where Coulson’s connection to the disparate heroes would be leveraged to bring them all together. The film also introduces Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), in an entirely pointless cameo that was clearly filmed separately from the rest of the film and cast.

Four films in and Marvel isn’t quite hitting their stride; the Iron Man films had set a good example of what would work for them, but they were still experimenting with different creators and tones much more readily than they would by phase 3.

While The Incredible Hulk was generic but competently made, Thor is a mixed bag, having interesting and compelling aspects in the story and worldbuilding but also parts that are rather dull and predictable, and combining some stellar visuals with baffling camera work. I think it does at least succeed in introducing us to the more out-there aspects of the Marvel universe, giving us some of the most ridiculous concepts so far but making them real through the connection to these characters.

Marvel was by this point gearing up for the anticipated team-up film, and the final post-credits stinger in Thor is a direct setup for 2012’s The Avengers. They still had one more character to introduce before they got there, though.

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