8. Thor: The Dark World (2013)

This post is part of a series I am writing on the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe from Iron Man to Spider-Man: Far From Home. There will be spoilers for the entire series of films.

Thor The Dark World (2013) Poster

A lot of people would tell you that Thor: The Dark World is the worst Marvel movie, but it isn’t. (The worst Marvel movie is either Iron Man 2 or Thor.) It sits pretty firmly in the tier of competent-but-forgettable films like Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant-Man or Doctor Strange. I think it just became a bit of a meme to put down this film, since it came out in the middle of a run of more successful releases, from Captain America: The First Avenger through to Guardians of the Galaxy.

The film had potential to be really good, but in my opinion it was sunk by some of the creative decisions surrounding the film’s antagonist, the dark elf Malekith. The dark elves come from the realm of Svartalfheim, and Malekith is a powerful, and evil, sorcerer who has faced off against Thor many times in Marvel’s comics. But the Marvel cinematic universe tends to move toward sci fi in its reinterpretation of comic material, and it does so here: The dark elves are essentially aliens with advanced technology, Malekith simply the leader and most ruthless of them. Rather than deep, lush forests full of magic, Svartalfheim is a blasted wasteland covered in darkness. The costume design on the elves, with stiff masks intended to look kind of creepy and unnerving, results in something that looks like a Doctor Who alien of the week.

Malekith from War of the Realms
Malekith the Accursed
Malekith from Thor: The Dark World
Also Malekith the Accursed

They’re generic alien soldiers, uniformly grey and dull, and utterly unmemorable. The worst part of it is that Malekith, usually a fun character in the vein of Loki – although more sadistic – is reduced to the same level of blandness. He has no personality in the film, and his iconic appearance – his face half blue, half black, with flowing white hair – is absent except for a small homage when he becomes scarred by Thor’s lightning – on the wrong side of his face.

The generic nature of the antagonists even extends to them having the exact same backstory as the frost giants of Thor – they tried to conquer the realms, Asgard fought them and stole the device that gave them their power – the Crucible in Thor, the Aether in The Dark World – and their world was left dark and lifeless until they try to infiltrate Asgard and steal it back.

I truly believe if they had gone in a different direction with the design of the elves, made them colourful, gave them personality, had them using magic instead of technology, this film could have been great fun to watch. Hela and Loki are a joy to watch because the writers and directors give the actors the opportunity to really go larger than life and have fun with the role – Malekith could have easily been the same.

The other place the film has problems is with the handling of Jane Foster – it does well enough with her in the beginning and the climax, but for a film that was intended to focus more heavily on the love story between Jane and Thor, she spends a significant amount of time as little more than a macguffin to be transported from place to place. During the parts of the film where Thor’s primary motivation is keeping Jane safe, the film lets her disappear into the background in favour of centering Thor and Loki’s relationship. This is not to say the Thor and Loki parts didn’t work – they’re a highlight of the film – but it’s a real disservice to Natalie Portman to have her character treated this way.

I know I’ve gone on a lot about the problems with this film after starting by saying “it’s not as bad as people say”, but it does bother me so much that Marvel would take an interesting character and reduce it to the most generic version possible. It’s also notable that they did this at the same time they released a Marvel One-Shot that retconned Iron Man 3’s villain – suggesting that Aldrich Killian was not in fact the Mandarin, but had used the name and imagery of a real terrorist to create his fake one. It shows that someone in Marvel felt like such major changes to iconic villains were not the right direction, and wanted to dial it back. Meanwhile, The Dark World does this to Malekith.

The result of the changes is that, while it’s not a bad film, it is very much a skippable one.

As far as the larger Marvel series, I’ve already touched in my Phase One post on how this was the first film to introduce the Infinity Stones, and name the Aether and Tesseract; the Aether is of course entirely unlike the Reality Stone we see used by Thanos, so I think some creative liberties have occurred as they put the Infinity Saga together. This film also became more significant with its inclusion in the time travel segments of Avengers: Engdame, with Thor returning to speak to his mother shortly before her death. The failure to include Natalie Portman in those scenes – beyond what seems to be some unused footage from The Dark World and perhaps some body double work – is a little disappointing; Portman’s departure from the role since this film has left a noticeable hole in Thor’s character development as the writers continue to dance around the subject, with lines like “sorry Jane dumped you” shrugged off by the hero in Thor Ragnarok.

If you’re a fan of the Marvel formula, Thor: The Dark World is fine. There’s enough in this one to enjoy. If you’re only looking to watch the best that the superhero genre has to offer, give it a miss.

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